buying Archive

  • Since the early 2000s, persistent allegations of a fraud ring peddling fake Norval Morrisseaus have cast suspicion on countless paintings hanging in public galleries and in private collections

    Picture-perfect forgery? Art world awaits court decision on alleged fake Norval Morrisseau painting

    Since the early 2000s, persistent allegations of a fraud ring peddling fake Norval Morrisseaus have cast suspicion on countless paintings hanging in public galleries and in private collections

    Continue Reading...

  • Tourmaline Oil Corp. is buying a significant package of shale oil and gas assets from Royal Dutch Shell for $1.37 billion, as the energy giant makes a further retreat from Canada.

    Tourmaline buying Shell assets in Alberta and BC for $1.4B

    Tourmaline Oil Corp. is buying a significant package of shale oil and gas assets from Royal Dutch Shell for $1.37 billion, as the energy giant makes a further retreat from Canada.

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  • By Lydia McNutt

Halloween is coming up, but if you've been paying any attention to the housing headlines this fall, you might be getting spooked for a whole other reason.

It could be the skyrocketing price of homes that's causing you to lose sleep. P...

    Nothing Is Spookier Than This Month’s Housing Situation

    By Lydia McNutt Halloween is coming up, but if you've been paying any attention to the housing headlines this fall, you might be getting spooked for a whole other reason. It could be the skyrocketing price of homes that's causing you to lose sleep. P...

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  • This post was originally seen on RateHub.ca.

Going to the gym instead of crashing on the couch, having a side salad instead of fries, or taking public transportation instead of driving. What do these things have in common with buying life insurance in...

    The 5 Worst Excuses For Not Getting Life Insurance

    This post was originally seen on RateHub.ca. Going to the gym instead of crashing on the couch, having a side salad instead of fries, or taking public transportation instead of driving. What do these things have in common with buying life insurance in...

    Continue Reading...

  • I love to use fresh herbs in my cooking because it adds a depth of flavour and a freshness that you just don't get from using dried herbs.

Here are two of my favourite fresh herbs -- their nutritional benefits, how to use and store them, and some Smar...

    Two Fresh And Flavourful Herbs To Enjoy This Summer

    I love to use fresh herbs in my cooking because it adds a depth of flavour and a freshness that you just don't get from using dried herbs. Here are two of my favourite fresh herbs -- their nutritional benefits, how to use and store them, and some Smar...

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  • 
(Photo credit: Jan Buchholtz via Flickr).

When you think of eating what's in season, you probably picture heading to your local farmer's market to pick up some fresh produce. Having the opportunity to connect with farmers is priceless, but not always...

    Big Box Grocers Are Finally On Board With The Local Food Trend

    (Photo credit: Jan Buchholtz via Flickr). When you think of eating what's in season, you probably picture heading to your local farmer's market to pick up some fresh produce. Having the opportunity to connect with farmers is priceless, but not always...

    Continue Reading...

  • Toxins are all around us. Whether it's the car fumes you inhale, the frozen dinner you eat, or the negative thoughts you have at work, toxins are everywhere.<br />
<blockquote>Note: to some degree, everything can be toxic in the right amounts, even oxygen and water. The word
    Our bodies are designed to handle daily toxic exposures through our detoxification and elimination organs, such as the liver, colon and kidneys, which do a pretty good job keeping us healthy.

    That being said, the things that we consume on a regular basis often raise the biggest concerns because of
    toxic accumulation. Anything that enters our bodies through direct contact with our mucosal membranes, inhaled into our lungs or touches our skin for long periods of time has the highest chance of entering our blood stream and influencing our health, for good or bad.

    It can feel daunting trying to identify and eliminate the toxins we are exposed to daily. Not only do we need to know what they are, but also what to do about them.

    Here are the seven edible toxins to be aware of and what you can do about them to keep you healthy:

    1. The dirty dozen

    How are they toxic?: The dirty dozen is a list of fruits and vegetables that are the most contaminated by pesticide use. Pesticides are associated with numerous health concerns including breast cancer, hormonal disruption, as well as neurotoxicity.

    These "dirty dozen" produce include: apples, strawberries, grapes, celery, peaches, spinach, sweet bell peppers, nectarines (imported), cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, snap peas (imported), potatoes.

    The solution: When considering buying local, organic and seasonal produce, keep this list in mind and check out the EWG listing for the top produce and pesticide residue data.

    Alternatively, start incorporating the "Clean 15," which includes the least-contaminated produce, in your favourite recipes: Avocados, sweet corn, pineapples, cabbage, frozen sweet peas, onions, asparagus, mangoes, papayas, kiwis, eggplant, grapefruit, cantaloupe, cauliflower, sweet potatoes.

    2. Processed foods, preservatives and additives

    How are they toxic?: When food is processed there has been a deliberate change made to it. These changes can include the addition of preservatives and additives, which are used to improve or preserve the taste and shelf stability.

    Many of these additions are unhealthy, such as aspartame, which has been linked to increased irritable mood and depression, as well as high fructose corn syrup, associated with metabolic syndrome and a potential factor in the obesity epidemic.

    The solution: Give your body a break from these chemicals and irritants by:
    • Washing your produce with more than just water (learn an easy DIY produce wash recipe).

    • Buying organic, local and seasonal produce (especially the "Dirty Dozen").

    • Avoiding detrimental additives such as artificial sweeteners, high fructose corn syrup, MSG, trans fats, olestra, food dyes, sodium chloride/ sulfite/ nitrate/ nitrite, BHA/ BHT/ propyl gallate, sulfur dioxide, potassium bromate and parabens.


    3. Excessive amounts of added sugar

    How is it toxic?: When the word "added" appears before sugar this specifies the addition of sugar to processed foods and beverages during their production. These added sugars have no nutritional value and can be toxic because they can contribute to tooth decay as well as obesity.

    The solution: Avoid candy, concentrated juices and soda pop by replacing them with healthier options, such as:

    • Raw fruits and veggies ( apples, avocados, oranges, peppers, tomatoes, cucumber, carrots, celery).

    • High protein snacks to help with satiation and blood sugar regulation (nuts and seeds, protein shakes, beans, lentils, tofu, meat).

    • More water and fresh juice.



    4. Heavy metals in seafood

    How are they toxic?: The unfortunate consequence of poor manufacturing processes include the contamination of our water ecosystems with heavy metal pollution.

    While many different seafood options, such as fish, provide beneficial omega 3 fatty acids, they can also be a source of methyl mercury. The exposure to this toxic heavy metal has been associated with a low risk of neurological damage and it has been recommended that pregnant women avoid fish species highest in mercury to prevent fetal developmental risk.

    The solution: Avoid seafood and fish at the top of the food chain, which contain high levels of mercury, and check out the EPA's safe amounts of mercury in shellfish and fish to evaluate the contamination levels of your favorite seafood.

    • Avoid shark, tuna, swordfish, king mackerel which are predator fish with higher amounts of mercury.

    • Stick to shrimp, sardines, anchovies, salmon, pollock, catfish and smaller fish (even in your fish oil).

    • Eat up to 12 ounces (two average meals) a week of a variety of fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury.



    5. Packaging coated with PFCs

    How are they toxic?: Perfluorinated compounds, aka PFCs, are man-made chemicals that have been used to make products that are resistant to heat, oil, stains, grease and water. Research has shown that exposure to these toxic chemicals has been linked to breast cancer, impairments in reproductive health, as well as fetal malformations.

    The solution: Avoid food wrappers, pizza boxes, microwavable popcorn and other PFC products, especially when re-heating.

    • Purchase responsible pre-packaged goods without PFCs.

    • Transfer microwavable foods to glass, ceramic or other safe-to-heat containers.

    • Re-heat your food on the stove or in the oven when possible.

    • Try to cook and eat fresh foods whenever possible.



    6. Not cooking or washing foods properly

    How is it toxic?: While meat is an excellent source of protein as well as heme iron (the most absorbable form of iron) it can also be a source of infectious bacteria and parasites.

    The solution: Especially when it comes to pork, chicken, turkey, fish and seafood, make sure they are cooked appropriately. Similarly, little critters can live among leafy greens and produces with a high surface area, such as broccoli.

    • Use a meat thermometer to estimate how cooked a thick piece of meat (temperature food guide).

    • Always wash your hands after touching raw meat so as to not transfer potential bacteria to other surfaces throughout the home.

    • Soak your produce for 10 minutes in a solution of water, salt, vinegar and grapefruit seed extract.



    7. Charcoal grilling

    How is it toxic?: There's nothing quite like the smell of the BBQ on a warm summer day. However, the burnt crust on your steaks and veggies, the result of firing up the grill, also means volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In large quantities these toxic compounds can be carcinogenic.

    The solution: While it might be impossible to avoid the BBQ, moderation is the key.

    • Limit your consumption of charcoal crispy bits of fatty meats and high oil vegetables from the BBQ but also skillet and oven

    • Try eating raw, steamed or poached foods more often



    "You are what you eat" -- we've all heard the saying, but if what you're consuming includes a high volume of the above mentioned items, you just might be toxic.

    While it is near impossible to avoid ALL the toxins ALL the time, limiting your exposure can reduce the accumulation of these harmful substances in your body, keeping you healthy now and in the future.

    Go on and be a conscious consumer, and eat well to be well!

    Follow HuffPost Canada Blogs on Facebook


    MORE ON HUFFPOST:



    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

    " title="Look Out For These 7 Toxins You Consume Every Day" />

    Look Out For These 7 Toxins You Consume Every Day

    Toxins are all around us. Whether it's the car fumes you inhale, the frozen dinner you eat, or the negative thoughts you have at work, toxins are everywhere.
    Note: to some degree, everything can be toxic in the right amounts, even oxygen and water. The word "toxin" is thrown around a lot and in this article, it refers to the consistent accumulation of mildly harmful substances that can cause more serious health concerns over time.

    Our bodies are designed to handle daily toxic exposures through our detoxification and elimination organs, such as the liver, colon and kidneys, which do a pretty good job keeping us healthy.

    That being said, the things that we consume on a regular basis often raise the biggest concerns because of toxic accumulation. Anything that enters our bodies through direct contact with our mucosal membranes, inhaled into our lungs or touches our skin for long periods of time has the highest chance of entering our blood stream and influencing our health, for good or bad.

    It can feel daunting trying to identify and eliminate the toxins we are exposed to daily. Not only do we need to know what they are, but also what to do about them.

    Here are the seven edible toxins to be aware of and what you can do about them to keep you healthy:

    1. The dirty dozen

    How are they toxic?: The dirty dozen is a list of fruits and vegetables that are the most contaminated by pesticide use. Pesticides are associated with numerous health concerns including breast cancer, hormonal disruption, as well as neurotoxicity.

    These "dirty dozen" produce include: apples, strawberries, grapes, celery, peaches, spinach, sweet bell peppers, nectarines (imported), cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, snap peas (imported), potatoes.

    The solution: When considering buying local, organic and seasonal produce, keep this list in mind and check out the EWG listing for the top produce and pesticide residue data.

    Alternatively, start incorporating the "Clean 15," which includes the least-contaminated produce, in your favourite recipes: Avocados, sweet corn, pineapples, cabbage, frozen sweet peas, onions, asparagus, mangoes, papayas, kiwis, eggplant, grapefruit, cantaloupe, cauliflower, sweet potatoes.

    2. Processed foods, preservatives and additives

    How are they toxic?: When food is processed there has been a deliberate change made to it. These changes can include the addition of preservatives and additives, which are used to improve or preserve the taste and shelf stability.

    Many of these additions are unhealthy, such as aspartame, which has been linked to increased irritable mood and depression, as well as high fructose corn syrup, associated with metabolic syndrome and a potential factor in the obesity epidemic.

    The solution: Give your body a break from these chemicals and irritants by:
    • Washing your produce with more than just water (learn an easy DIY produce wash recipe).

    • Buying organic, local and seasonal produce (especially the "Dirty Dozen").

    • Avoiding detrimental additives such as artificial sweeteners, high fructose corn syrup, MSG, trans fats, olestra, food dyes, sodium chloride/ sulfite/ nitrate/ nitrite, BHA/ BHT/ propyl gallate, sulfur dioxide, potassium bromate and parabens.


    3. Excessive amounts of added sugar

    How is it toxic?: When the word "added" appears before sugar this specifies the addition of sugar to processed foods and beverages during their production. These added sugars have no nutritional value and can be toxic because they can contribute to tooth decay as well as obesity.

    The solution: Avoid candy, concentrated juices and soda pop by replacing them with healthier options, such as:

    • Raw fruits and veggies ( apples, avocados, oranges, peppers, tomatoes, cucumber, carrots, celery).

    • High protein snacks to help with satiation and blood sugar regulation (nuts and seeds, protein shakes, beans, lentils, tofu, meat).

    • More water and fresh juice.



    4. Heavy metals in seafood

    How are they toxic?: The unfortunate consequence of poor manufacturing processes include the contamination of our water ecosystems with heavy metal pollution.

    While many different seafood options, such as fish, provide beneficial omega 3 fatty acids, they can also be a source of methyl mercury. The exposure to this toxic heavy metal has been associated with a low risk of neurological damage and it has been recommended that pregnant women avoid fish species highest in mercury to prevent fetal developmental risk.

    The solution: Avoid seafood and fish at the top of the food chain, which contain high levels of mercury, and check out the EPA's safe amounts of mercury in shellfish and fish to evaluate the contamination levels of your favorite seafood.

    • Avoid shark, tuna, swordfish, king mackerel which are predator fish with higher amounts of mercury.

    • Stick to shrimp, sardines, anchovies, salmon, pollock, catfish and smaller fish (even in your fish oil).

    • Eat up to 12 ounces (two average meals) a week of a variety of fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury.



    5. Packaging coated with PFCs

    How are they toxic?: Perfluorinated compounds, aka PFCs, are man-made chemicals that have been used to make products that are resistant to heat, oil, stains, grease and water. Research has shown that exposure to these toxic chemicals has been linked to breast cancer, impairments in reproductive health, as well as fetal malformations.

    The solution: Avoid food wrappers, pizza boxes, microwavable popcorn and other PFC products, especially when re-heating.

    • Purchase responsible pre-packaged goods without PFCs.

    • Transfer microwavable foods to glass, ceramic or other safe-to-heat containers.

    • Re-heat your food on the stove or in the oven when possible.

    • Try to cook and eat fresh foods whenever possible.



    6. Not cooking or washing foods properly

    How is it toxic?: While meat is an excellent source of protein as well as heme iron (the most absorbable form of iron) it can also be a source of infectious bacteria and parasites.

    The solution: Especially when it comes to pork, chicken, turkey, fish and seafood, make sure they are cooked appropriately. Similarly, little critters can live among leafy greens and produces with a high surface area, such as broccoli.

    • Use a meat thermometer to estimate how cooked a thick piece of meat (temperature food guide).

    • Always wash your hands after touching raw meat so as to not transfer potential bacteria to other surfaces throughout the home.

    • Soak your produce for 10 minutes in a solution of water, salt, vinegar and grapefruit seed extract.



    7. Charcoal grilling

    How is it toxic?: There's nothing quite like the smell of the BBQ on a warm summer day. However, the burnt crust on your steaks and veggies, the result of firing up the grill, also means volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In large quantities these toxic compounds can be carcinogenic.

    The solution: While it might be impossible to avoid the BBQ, moderation is the key.

    • Limit your consumption of charcoal crispy bits of fatty meats and high oil vegetables from the BBQ but also skillet and oven

    • Try eating raw, steamed or poached foods more often



    "You are what you eat" -- we've all heard the saying, but if what you're consuming includes a high volume of the above mentioned items, you just might be toxic.

    While it is near impossible to avoid ALL the toxins ALL the time, limiting your exposure can reduce the accumulation of these harmful substances in your body, keeping you healthy now and in the future.

    Go on and be a conscious consumer, and eat well to be well!

    Follow HuffPost Canada Blogs on Facebook


    MORE ON HUFFPOST:



    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

    Continue Reading...

  • Written by Elisa Krovblit

With the average price of a detached home out of most first-time buyers' reach, those with less than $1 million to spend have a few options. Most choose one of three routes: 

Stay in the city and buy a condo within budget, h...

    Some Seriously Unconventional Ways To Afford Real Estate

    Written by Elisa Krovblit With the average price of a detached home out of most first-time buyers' reach, those with less than $1 million to spend have a few options. Most choose one of three routes: Stay in the city and buy a condo within budget, h...

    Continue Reading...

  • Written by Olivia Bowden 

Your son in his mid-20s is living at home to save on the high rental rates in the city. Or your daughter is so straddled with student debt that even with her job, she needs to live at home while she pays off loans.

    How To Prepare For Millennials Living At Home

    Written by Olivia Bowden Your son in his mid-20s is living at home to save on the high rental rates in the city. Or your daughter is so straddled with student debt that even with her job, she needs to live at home while she pays off loans. "It's a m...

    Continue Reading...

  • If you had the choice between buying a downtown condo or a house far off in the suburbs for the same price -- which would you choose?

Millennials considering their first foray into homeownership are often placed into a box -- or more aptly put, a box ...

    Here’s Where You Can Buy A House Near The GTA On A Condo Budget

    If you had the choice between buying a downtown condo or a house far off in the suburbs for the same price -- which would you choose? Millennials considering their first foray into homeownership are often placed into a box -- or more aptly put, a box ...

    Continue Reading...

  • Like many, I know summer is here when my calendar starts to fill up with a variety of activities -- barbecues, sporting events, patio time, family road trips, picnics and cottage time. Who doesn't want to take advantage of this time of year before the ...

    Think Second-Hand To Save On Your Summer Adventures

    Like many, I know summer is here when my calendar starts to fill up with a variety of activities -- barbecues, sporting events, patio time, family road trips, picnics and cottage time. Who doesn't want to take advantage of this time of year before the ...

    Continue Reading...