higher Archive

  • Women ages 18 to 29 who reported having the most frequent sex remembered more abstract words, but not more faces

    Sex on the brain: Regular heterosexual intercourse may improve memory in women, study suggests

    Women ages 18 to 29 who reported having the most frequent sex remembered more abstract words, but not more faces

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  • Earlier this year I retired after a dozen years as president of Innovative Medicines Canada. Shortly after I took an assignment with the Canadian Diabetes Association and the opportunity to work on what is one of Canada's largest and most perplexing ch...

    Canada Still Has A Chance To Reverse Its Diabetes Epidemic

    Earlier this year I retired after a dozen years as president of Innovative Medicines Canada. Shortly after I took an assignment with the Canadian Diabetes Association and the opportunity to work on what is one of Canada's largest and most perplexing ch...

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  • 
        
                                        A new report by the Canadian Forces shows that soldiers who have been deployed overseas are at a higher risk of taking their own lives, and the risk for those serving in the army is much greater that it...

    Canadian Forces report on suicide shows higher risk for soldiers who served overseas

    A new report by the Canadian Forces shows that soldiers who have been deployed overseas are at a higher risk of taking their own lives, and the risk for those serving in the army is much greater that it...

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  • Written by Katherine Nazimek, a Communications Advisor at Sunnybrook.

    ‘Good’ Cholesterol: You Can Have Too Much Of A Good Thing

    Written by Katherine Nazimek, a Communications Advisor at Sunnybrook. "Everything in moderation." What was once my excuse to periodically indulge in some not-so-good behaviours (read: eating dessert), is now the motto too for over-indulging in those "...

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  • More than a century after Wilfrid Laurier grandly declared the 20th century would be ‘the century of Canada,’ Canadians may at last be ready to take him up on it

    Andrew Coyne: Increased immigration is good for Canada — and the reasons aren’t only economic

    More than a century after Wilfrid Laurier grandly declared the 20th century would be ‘the century of Canada,’ Canadians may at last be ready to take him up on it

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  • 
(Photo: Shutterstock)

It seems like every time you turn on the television or log onto the Internet these days, it's déjà vu: there's news of another all-too familiar story playing out before your eyes and it's one we're beginning to know far too we...

    Canada Has Its Own Demons When It Comes To Police Brutality

    (Photo: Shutterstock) It seems like every time you turn on the television or log onto the Internet these days, it's déjà vu: there's news of another all-too familiar story playing out before your eyes and it's one we're beginning to know far too we...

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  • Written by Elisa Krovblit

You're a model tenant living in Ontario. You look after your apartment. You pay your rent on time. You've never had a complaint -- or received one.

You're being evicted. It's happening a fair bit: great tenants with no inten...

    Ontario Landlords Can Legally Kick You Out And Move Right On In

    Written by Elisa Krovblit You're a model tenant living in Ontario. You look after your apartment. You pay your rent on time. You've never had a complaint -- or received one. You're being evicted. It's happening a fair bit: great tenants with no inten...

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  • The test appeared to be much bigger than North Korea's previous detonations and was touted as a ' response to hostile powers, including the United States'

    North Korea conducts fifth nuclear test in eight months, claims it has made warheads with ‘high strike power’

    The test appeared to be much bigger than North Korea's previous detonations and was touted as a ' response to hostile powers, including the United States'

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  • This week, Canadian physicians are gathering for the annual meeting of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Often called Canada's

    Extreme Heat Consequences Of Climate Change Hurt Public Health

    This week, Canadian physicians are gathering for the annual meeting of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Often called Canada's "Parliament of Medicine," one of the meeting's strategic sessions is zeroing in on the health consequences of climate c...

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  • The individuals were participating in the Port Huron Float Down, an annual event on the river that divides Michigan from Ontario

    Fifteen hundred possibly drunk Americans successfully invade Canada via the St. Clair River

    The individuals were participating in the Port Huron Float Down, an annual event on the river that divides Michigan from Ontario

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  • When it comes to health, there are two streams of advice. The first is medical in nature, held true by doctors and supported by clinical trials and years, if not decades, of evidence. The other can be best described as the
    Despite this imbalance in scientific validity, in many cases, Canadians will choose grandma over GP. Why? Ask anyone and you'll probably hear: "The methods work." For anyone specializing in public health research, trying to justify using an onion inside a sock to help cure a cold, chewing raw garlic to clear a sore throat or drinking chicken soup to beat a fever can be quite a challenge.

    Over the years, researchers have tried to understand the mechanism behind these apparently effective procedures. The answer usually lies in the chemical composition of the natural product. In all three cases, the plants contain chemicals with natural antimicrobial activity and as such, help the body to combat infection. Chicken soup also has anti-inflammatory agents to help calm down that fever.

    The number of activities given the scientific stamp of approval continues to grow. Yet, some have never been tested even though they have been used -- sometimes even by health professionals -- for decades, if not centuries. One example is gargling with salt water. Although most people believe this is an effective way to maintain oral health, particularly when gums are injured, there has been an absence of actual evidence to suggest this does anything other than offer a brief sensation of relief (which admittedly may be enough).


    Their results once again revealed the validity of traditional practice in our modern lives.


    But last week, science finally caught up with grandma. An international team of researchers
    published a laboratory examination of salt water on the cells inside the mouth. Their results once again revealed the validity of traditional practice in our modern lives.

    The researchers wanted to make sure the experiments reflected real-life situations, so they acted as tooth fairies in lab coats. Volunteers undergoing molar extractions provided their teeth to the team -- although there was no word on how much money they received in return. The teeth were brought back to the lab where the gum tissue was separated and cultured. These cells, known as human gingival fibroblasts, were then kept for use later on.

    The cells were then scratched to mimic injury in the mouth and then rinsed to leave an experimental wound. At this point, the gargling could begin. Over the next few days, the cells were subjected to various concentrations of salt water ranging from pure water (control) to a rather high (7.2 per cent), which is akin to brine. The cells were examined by microscopy for any signs of healing.

    When the data was analyzed, the results offered a rather surprising finding. Of the different concentrations used, the fastest healing occurred in the presence of 0.9 per cent and 1.8 per cent salt. The higher amounts seemed to have little effect.

    In a biological sense, this makes perfect sense. The fluid in our bodies contains on average 0.9 per cent salt. The addition of the lower concentration of salt water increases the amount of fluid needed for healing. Going any higher leads to a negative effect in which the body doesn't respond.

    But this wasn't the only goal of the study. The researchers also wanted to know the mechanism behind the healing. Although one might expect the body was simply making more cells faster with the saline rinse, the results suggested this wasn't the case. Instead, the healing cells migrated from dense environments into the wound zone. This balancing of cell density allowed for a more natural healing process.

    Going even deeper into the molecular realm, the researchers examined how the healing cells changed when they migrated. The group found the salt water appeared to increase the formation of proteins known to help attach cells together, known as adhesion. With each rinse, the cells made more of these proteins to ensure migrating cells would anchor themselves into the wound area and improve healing.

    For the authors, this study provided a mechanism to explain why gargling with salt water -- as long as it is not too concentrated -- can be helpful in oral care. While they focused on wounds, the results suggest this type of adhesion improvement can happen even when there is no injury. This may be able to help reduce the effects of other chronic ailments such as gingivitis.

    As for how to best gargle with salt, the researchers provided a recipe. Simply add one teaspoon of salt to one cup of water. Granted, this may not exactly match grandma's advice, but in this case you may have a justification. After all, she's still right, but now you're following the science to achieve the best results.

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    " title="It’s Official! Gargling With Salt Water Actually Works" />

    It’s Official! Gargling With Salt Water Actually Works

    When it comes to health, there are two streams of advice. The first is medical in nature, held true by doctors and supported by clinical trials and years, if not decades, of evidence. The other can be best described as the "grandma" approach. There's little to no information on the mechanism, clinical evidence simply does not exist and most likely no support comes from medical professionals.

    Despite this imbalance in scientific validity, in many cases, Canadians will choose grandma over GP. Why? Ask anyone and you'll probably hear: "The methods work." For anyone specializing in public health research, trying to justify using an onion inside a sock to help cure a cold, chewing raw garlic to clear a sore throat or drinking chicken soup to beat a fever can be quite a challenge.

    Over the years, researchers have tried to understand the mechanism behind these apparently effective procedures. The answer usually lies in the chemical composition of the natural product. In all three cases, the plants contain chemicals with natural antimicrobial activity and as such, help the body to combat infection. Chicken soup also has anti-inflammatory agents to help calm down that fever.

    The number of activities given the scientific stamp of approval continues to grow. Yet, some have never been tested even though they have been used -- sometimes even by health professionals -- for decades, if not centuries. One example is gargling with salt water. Although most people believe this is an effective way to maintain oral health, particularly when gums are injured, there has been an absence of actual evidence to suggest this does anything other than offer a brief sensation of relief (which admittedly may be enough).


    Their results once again revealed the validity of traditional practice in our modern lives.


    But last week, science finally caught up with grandma. An international team of researchers published a laboratory examination of salt water on the cells inside the mouth. Their results once again revealed the validity of traditional practice in our modern lives.

    The researchers wanted to make sure the experiments reflected real-life situations, so they acted as tooth fairies in lab coats. Volunteers undergoing molar extractions provided their teeth to the team -- although there was no word on how much money they received in return. The teeth were brought back to the lab where the gum tissue was separated and cultured. These cells, known as human gingival fibroblasts, were then kept for use later on.

    The cells were then scratched to mimic injury in the mouth and then rinsed to leave an experimental wound. At this point, the gargling could begin. Over the next few days, the cells were subjected to various concentrations of salt water ranging from pure water (control) to a rather high (7.2 per cent), which is akin to brine. The cells were examined by microscopy for any signs of healing.

    When the data was analyzed, the results offered a rather surprising finding. Of the different concentrations used, the fastest healing occurred in the presence of 0.9 per cent and 1.8 per cent salt. The higher amounts seemed to have little effect.

    In a biological sense, this makes perfect sense. The fluid in our bodies contains on average 0.9 per cent salt. The addition of the lower concentration of salt water increases the amount of fluid needed for healing. Going any higher leads to a negative effect in which the body doesn't respond.

    But this wasn't the only goal of the study. The researchers also wanted to know the mechanism behind the healing. Although one might expect the body was simply making more cells faster with the saline rinse, the results suggested this wasn't the case. Instead, the healing cells migrated from dense environments into the wound zone. This balancing of cell density allowed for a more natural healing process.

    Going even deeper into the molecular realm, the researchers examined how the healing cells changed when they migrated. The group found the salt water appeared to increase the formation of proteins known to help attach cells together, known as adhesion. With each rinse, the cells made more of these proteins to ensure migrating cells would anchor themselves into the wound area and improve healing.

    For the authors, this study provided a mechanism to explain why gargling with salt water -- as long as it is not too concentrated -- can be helpful in oral care. While they focused on wounds, the results suggest this type of adhesion improvement can happen even when there is no injury. This may be able to help reduce the effects of other chronic ailments such as gingivitis.

    As for how to best gargle with salt, the researchers provided a recipe. Simply add one teaspoon of salt to one cup of water. Granted, this may not exactly match grandma's advice, but in this case you may have a justification. After all, she's still right, but now you're following the science to achieve the best results.

    Follow HuffPost Canada Blogs on Facebook


    MORE ON HUFFPOST:




    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

    Continue Reading...

  • VANCOUVER—If the federal government replaces Canada’s current voting system with Proportional Representation (PR), it is highly likely that Canada will be governed by coalitions rather than majority governments leading to higher levels of governmen...

    Changing election rules could lead to more coalition governments and higher government spending and

    VANCOUVER—If the federal government replaces Canada’s current voting system with Proportional Representation (PR), it is highly likely that Canada will be governed by coalitions rather than majority governments leading to higher levels of governmen...

    Continue Reading...